Every mother dreams that her child will grow up safe, healthy and happy. Unfortunately, too many American mothers see their dreams for their children shattered by gun violence.

Moms Demand Action has created The Mother’s Dream Quilt Project to symbolize the human toll of gun violence in America, as well as mothers’ shared commitment to making our country safer for our children.

 
In Honor of:
Description:
 
Fuzzy Blanket Quilt
Fuzzy Blanket Quilt

Fuzzy Blanket Quilt

In January of 2010, Dana Monique Harvey committed suicide with a gun in Seattle, WA. A little over four years later, Dana’s mother, Zoe Ann Moore-Boddie joined about 10 other moms at the Freedom Church in South Seattle to hold a quilting bee honoring Dana’s life. The eight blocks in the center of the quilt were all created at that event; four of the squares contain pieces of Dana’s fuzzy baby blanket.

Dana was one of the 30,000 people killed by guns each year in the United States, yet her death touched an entire community - and so it goes with each of those 30,000 victims. The Fuzzy Blanket Quilt, with Dana’s blanket surrounded by squares contributed from mothers around the country, represents the broad community of mothers who grieve for each life lost.

Fuzzy Blanket Quilt
 
Four Corners Quilt
Four Corners Quilt

Four Corners Quilt

The Four Corners quilt - the first in our Mother’s Dream series - incorporates blocks from the four corners of the United States: the Northwest, Southwest, Northeast and Southeast. Blocks honoring victims and survivors are arranged in the center of the quilt, surrounded by blocks from men, women and children who dream of a world free of gun violence.

Four Corners Quilt
 
Chicago Quilt
Chicago Quilt

Chicago Quilt

The Chicago Quilt stitches together 48 stories of people lost to gun violence: the honor student gunned down at a fastfood restaurant; the gun violence prevention advocate shot in her car on her way home from an anti-violence charity event; the dance loving teenager living with out of town relatives so he could escape Chicago’s violence, yet killed while visiting home over summer vacation. Chicago’s loss cannot be contained in the dimensions of a single quilt.

For each of the quilt’s 48 blocks, countless more stories can be told about the gun violence pervading the city’s communities. But at quilting bees at St. Sabina’s Church on Chicago’s south side and St. Martin De Porres Church on the city’s west side in the spring and summer of 2014, families met to share their grief and to memorialize these 48 friends, students, husbands, brothers, daughters and sons. The Chicago Quilt honors a community grieving -- a community still hoping to heal.

Chicago Quilt
 
Indy Quilt
Indy Quilt

Indy Quilt

The Indy Quilt is made up primarily of squares that were created at a quilting bee in Indianapolis, where members of Moms Demand Action from around the country gathered to protest outside the National Rifle Association’s annual convention.

Indy Quilt
 
Iron Pipeline Quilt
Iron Pipeline Quilt

Iron Pipeline Quilt

Every year, tens of thousands of guns make their way into the hands of criminals through illegal trafficking channels. These firearms contribute to the more than 12,000 gun murders in the United States each year. In the absence of common-sense federal gun laws that crack down on trafficking, criminals can easily transport guns from areas with lax laws into regions with strong laws. Known as the “Iron Pipeline,” this route is devastating to communities around the country, whose laws are undermined by the easy availability of guns the next state - or even the next town - over.

Despite the city’s gun sense policies, Chicago is tormented by a reputation for gun violence, in large part due to the thousands of crime guns traced to Indiana, Mississippi and even neighboring cities without common-sense laws.

This quilt surrounds survivor blocks memorializing 26 victims of Chicago gun violence with blocks of hope and support from states that are part of the Iron Pipeline. With this quilt, we hope to replace the flow of guns into our cities with a flood of love instead.

Iron Pipeline Quilt
 
Grandparents Quilt
Grandparents Quilt

Grandparents Quilt

The affection between grandparents and their grandchildren is unique in both its purity and its simplicity: the quiet moments shared, the unconditional love conferred. But while grandparents revel in doting on their children’s children, many also share an apprehension about the world they will bequeath to their grandchildren.

This quilt is made of blocks submitted by grandparents and grandchildren united in their desire to see a country free of gun violence - a desire that resonates across the generations.

Grandparents Quilt
 
DUMBO Quilt
DUMBO Quilt

DUMBO Quilt

Over a weekend in September 2014, thousands of visitors from around the country and the world came to the Brooklyn neighborhood of DUMBO for the annual DUMBO Arts Festival, where the first three completed quilts in the Mother’s Dream series were on display. For many visitors the quilts were the first time they could WITNESS the massive impact of gun violence. So many patterned squares, so many lives lost to gun violence: murder, domestic violence, suicide. Too much pain.

We encouraged guests to create their own squares. Some shared memories of loved ones lost to gun violence; others shared their life goals; and many shared their dreams of a safer future for all of us.

DUMBO Quilt

Events

 

Illinois
Kentucky
Minnesota
Colorado
Massachusetts
Washington, D.C.

 

Learn More

 

If you’d like to attend an event for the 2015 tour, or learn more about starting a quilting event in your area — fill out the form below and an organizer will be in touch.

 

A Note of Thanks to Our Supporters


 

The Mother’s Dream Quilt Project is an ongoing collaboration by a group of passionate and dedicated volunteers. Special thanks to Sarah Doyle, Jaime Pessin and June Rubin; Stacy Gorman, Janina Bandi, Jaime Bedrin, Beth Eisgrau-Heller, Jenna Fox, Ann Haaser, Wayne Rhodes and Elizabeth Stember; and to everyone who has opened their homes and communities to host quilting bees.